Skip to content

NH secretary of state says first-in-nation tradition will continue regardless of DNC action


New Hampshire’s secretary of state said Friday he’s not concerned about a move by the Democratic National Committee to end the state’s first-in-the-nation primary status.A DNC subcommittee voted Friday to move South Carolina to the front of the presidential nominating calendar, tossing Iowa out of the mix of early-voting states and placing New Hampshire second, on the same day as Nevada would vote.The subcommittee also asked Gov. Sununu and House Majority Leader Jason Osborne to send them signed letters agreeing to accommodate the ruling. Osborne said in a statement to News9: “Yes, I have a letter for the DNC. Looking forward to sending it.”New Hampshire Secretary of State David Scanlan said he’s not concerned about losing first-in-the-nation status.”We’ve been through this before in the past with other states challenging our first-in-the-nation status,” Scanlan said. “And we know we’ve always been able to maintain our position and this time around will be no different.”Scanlan said he’s confident thanks to a state law that requires New Hampshire to hold its primary a week before any similar election.”New Hampshire will hold the first-in-the-nation primary, no matter what sanctions may be out there,” he said.Professor Chris Galdieri at Saint Anselm College said he is not surprised President Biden wants to put South Carolina first on the calendar. “That is the state that rescued his candidacy in 2020,” Galdieri said. “Without it, he probably would not be president today.”Galdieri said he thinks the DNC needs a full vote. Even if the change goes forward, he said the Granite State will not lose its fanfare.”Look at states like Nevada, look at states like South Carolina that have been early but not first,” Galdieri said. “They still get plenty of attention from politicians, but they don’t have that first move or advantage where they play such a huge role in determining who the parties nominees are.”Voters News 9 spoke with had varying opinions about the news. One man said the New Hampshire primary is “probably not nearly as important as some people make it out to be,” while others said they like the tradition of holding the first primary.Voters said that no matter the outcome of the process, they still intend to get out and vote.

New Hampshire’s secretary of state said Friday he’s not concerned about a move by the Democratic National Committee to end the state’s first-in-the-nation primary status.

A DNC subcommittee voted Friday to move South Carolina to the front of the presidential nominating calendar, tossing Iowa out of the mix of early-voting states and placing New Hampshire second, on the same day as Nevada would vote.

The subcommittee also asked Gov. Sununu and House Majority Leader Jason Osborne to send them signed letters agreeing to accommodate the ruling.

Osborne said in a statement to News9: “Yes, I have a letter for the DNC. Looking forward to sending it.”

New Hampshire Secretary of State David Scanlan said he’s not concerned about losing first-in-the-nation status.

“We’ve been through this before in the past with other states challenging our first-in-the-nation status,” Scanlan said. “And we know we’ve always been able to maintain our position and this time around will be no different.”

Scanlan said he’s confident thanks to a state law that requires New Hampshire to hold its primary a week before any similar election.

“New Hampshire will hold the first-in-the-nation primary, no matter what sanctions may be out there,” he said.

Professor Chris Galdieri at Saint Anselm College said he is not surprised President Biden wants to put South Carolina first on the calendar.

“That is the state that rescued his candidacy in 2020,” Galdieri said. “Without it, he probably would not be president today.”

Galdieri said he thinks the DNC needs a full vote. Even if the change goes forward, he said the Granite State will not lose its fanfare.

“Look at states like Nevada, look at states like South Carolina that have been early but not first,” Galdieri said. “They still get plenty of attention from politicians, but they don’t have that first move or advantage where they play such a huge role in determining who the parties nominees are.”

Voters News 9 spoke with had varying opinions about the news. One man said the New Hampshire primary is “probably not nearly as important as some people make it out to be,” while others said they like the tradition of holding the first primary.

Voters said that no matter the outcome of the process, they still intend to get out and vote.